Lecture 3: Intellectual Property

Lecture 3: Intellectual Property
In this lecture, you will learn about the theory of patents, patent rules and what makes for a strong patent, among other topics. You will learn how to protect your intellectual property by building and maintaining patent fences and we will examine important legal and policy issues as they relate to drug discovery and development.
Buy Course - 99.00 USD

Course Outline

Welcome – Lecture Objectives

Lecture 3: Intellectual Property

  1. Lecture Intro
  2. Section 1 – Philosophy and History of Patents, Briefly
  3. Section 2 – What Can and Cannot Be Patented
  4. Section 3 – Patent Structure: First Page, Specifications and Claims
  5. Section 4 – Kinds of Patents: Products or Processes
  6. Section 5 – What Makes for A Strong Patent
  7. Section 6 – Building and Maintaining Patent Fences
  8. Section 7 – Company Patent Reviews: The Company's Intellectual Property Committee
  9. Section 8 – Are Genes and Other Natural Products Patentable
  10. Section 9 – Important Legislative & Policy Issues
  11. Section 10 – Exclusivity Period for Branded Biologics

Mini-textbook

  1. Lecture 3 Mini-textbook

Philosophy and History of Patents

  1. Solving the Drug Patent Problem

Patent Structure: First Page, Specifications, and Claims

  1. America Invents Act – 2011

Are Genes and Other Natural Products Patentable?

  1. Supreme Court Opinion on Gene Patenting
  2. Analyzing Nature-Based Products Module

Important Legislative & Policy Issues

  1. Judge tosses $200M award to Merck in hep C patent suit
  2. Broad Institute Gets Patent on Revolutionary Gene-Editing Method
  3. Who Owns the Biggest Biotech Discovery of the Century?
  4. CRISPR Patent Fight Now a Winner-Take-All Match
  5. CRISPR-Cas systems and methods for altering expression of gene products
  6. Gilead to pay Merck $200 million in damages for Hep C patents

Final exam

  1. Certificate of Completion Exam – Lecture 3
  2. Certificate of Completion Exam – Intellectual Property

About the Course

Strong patents are one of the most important aspects of a successful biotechnology company. If you haven’t been involved in patenting an invention, you may have misunderstandings about what can and what cannot be patented and what is important in a patent. Furthermore, to communicate effectively with patent lawyers, a basic understanding of patent law is necessary. Since biotechnology companies should be looking constantly to strengthen their patent positions to keep competitors at bay, you will also learn some aspects of company patent strategy.

The lecture features both basic material and advanced material, depending on how deeply you wish to pursue a topic. In the basic part of the lecture, you will learn about the theory of patents, patent rules and what makes for a strong patent, among other topics. In the advanced part, you will learn how to protect your intellectual property by building and maintaining patent fences and by frequent review of patent position through the company’s intellectual property committee. Finally, the lecture will and we will explore important legal and policy issues as they relate to drug discovery and development.

Basic materials

  • Why patents are necessary
  • What can and cannot be patented?
  • Patent structure
  • Some patent rules: inventors, premature disclosure, first to file, full disclosure
  • Provisional applications
  • Kinds of patents
  • What makes for a strong patent?
  • Follow-on and international patents

Advanced materials

  • Building and maintaining patent fences
  • Company patent reviews
  • Important legal, legislative & policy issues
    • Recent debate and court rulings on natural products patents
    • Patent rights battle over the Crispr-Cas9 technology?
    • Patent battle over the antiviral drug Sofosbuvir?
  • Exclusivity period for branded biologics

Each online lecture is equivalent to about 2-3 live classroom lectures.

Purchase of any lecture in this series provides several resources:

  • The lecture with dozens of visuals and audios
  • A mini-textbook of the lecture material, yours to download and keep
  • Several handouts to supplement both the lecture and mini-textbook
  • A Certificate of Completion for those who pass a simple exam on key points
The lectures feature both basic material and advanced material, depending on how deeply you wish to pursue a topic.
There are several ways to learn:
  • Look and listen to get a general overview of the topic
  • Study the material by stopping frequently as you go through the lecture
  • Read the mini-textbook to supplement the lecture and to keep as a future reference
  • Delve deeply into a topic by reading the handouts and accessing directly the Internet address references on your screen
  • Arrange for an Office Hours session with the lecturer as an earlier adopter

About the Instructors

Lynn Klotz

Lynn Klotz, Co-Managing Director and Chief Science Officer

Lynn C. Klotz received a BA in mathematics from Princeton University (1965) and a PhD in chemistry from the University of California, San Diego (1971). He was formerly an Assistant and Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Harvard University (1971-1979) and a visiting Associate Professor at Princeton University (1979-1981). He was a founder and board member of BioTechnica International (1981-1988)-an agricultural and natural products company. Within BioTechnica, he founded BioTechnica Diagnostics, a periodontal-disease DNA-probe diagnostics company and BioTal a Wales-based environmental-remediation biotechnology company. He recently served as Research Scholar and Adjunct Professor at the Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

As a consultant, Dr. Klotz co-founded (1994) and served on the scientific advisory board of Codon, a biotechnology company focused on curing genetic diseases. More recently, he was interim chief executive officer of Precision Genetics (2001-2006), an unfunded company developing gene-repair methods based on Yale and Princeton University technologies.

Dr. Klotz was a recipient of the prestigious Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar grant for teaching excellence while at Harvard University. He was also nominated for a Pulitzer Prize by the publisher Charles Scribner’s Sons, along with co-author Edward Sylvester, for the 1983 book The Gene Age: Genetic Engineering and the Next Industrial Revolution.
In the fall of 2011 and 2012, Dr. Klotz taught a graduate-level Harvard Extension Course, BIOT E-210, Biotechnology and Drug Development: Tools for Business.

William Diehl

William Diehl, ​Co-Managing Director and Chief Technology Officer

William C. Diehl, Ph.D. is Coordinator of Online Graduate Programs in the Adult Education program and Assistant Professor at The Pennsylvania State University at University Park, PA. Dr. Diehl serves as Interviews Editor for The American Journal of Distance Education, and is an expert reviewer for other academic journals. He is the founder of the International Museum of Distance Education and Technology project.

Additionally, Diehl is a consultant in the corporate, higher education and government sectors. Professional experience also includes work as a K-12 teacher, web designer and developer, instructional designer, and multimedia specialist.

Dr. Diehl is author and co-author of numerous book chapters, articles in academic journals, including the Handbook of Distance Education and The Handbook of mLearning. His research interests include historical and research foundations of Open and distance education, course design, distance education theory, emerging technologies, virtual worlds, and intercultural communication.

Dr. Diehl earned his Ph.D. in Adult Education with a focus in Distance Education from The Pennsylvania State University. His undergraduate degree focused on Elementary Education.